Social Education in Japan

  • Asuka Kawano Nagoya University
  • Takeo Matsuda Nagoya University
  • Lan Xiao Nagoya University
Keywords: social education, lifelong learning, Kominkan (community education center), community development, self-education, socialization of education, sozialpädagogik

Abstract

The concept similar to social pedagogy is ‘social education’ in Japan. The aim of this paper is to clarify the reality of social education in Japan, through discussion on the history, theory, methodologies, professionalization and practice of social education in Japan. The goal of social education is to achieve individual self-fulfillment by either systematically organizing formal education and non-formal education, or accumulating non-formal education, and at the same time, contributing to a better society. It also means the realization of a social capital in a community. The realization of a better society and individual self-fulfillment are the social welfare philosophy itself. Although the ways of approaching social education and social welfare are different, it may be said that they share the same philosophy.

In recent years, there have been attempts to integrate social education and welfare, and develop structurally-consolidated practices in some communities. Administratively, it is a challenge to bureaucratic sectionalism, and the problem is with the arrangement of staffing who are in charge of its practice. It is possible to create a Social Education Welfare practice in communities by assigning staff who are in charge of social education and staff who are in charge of social welfare. Both of the groups will cooperate and work together. The practice carried out by the cooperation between social education and welfare will lead to the development of community and also the structure of community governance.

  In the future, it is required to develop communities for the purpose of realization of a better society through the practices of social welfare and education. The structure of Social Education Welfare based on communities suggests the direction of social education in Japan in the future.

Author Biographies

Asuka Kawano, Nagoya University
ASUKAKAWANO (Ph.D. in Education), is an Associate Professorof the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at Nagoya University, Japan. She completed her undergraduate degree in jurisprudence, and received her master`s degree in the study of education at Fukuoka University. She was a research fellow at the Tashkent State Pedagogical University, Uzbekistan in 2006-2008 and conducted many field works on education and local communities in Uzbekistan and Central Asian countries. She earned her Ph.D. in education at Kyushu University, Japan. Her main areas of interest are education in Central Asia, social pedagogy, the international cooperation of adult education, community education and lifelong learning.
Takeo Matsuda, Nagoya University
TAKEO MATSUDA (Ph.D. in Education) is a Professorof the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at Nagoya University, Japan. He completed his undergraduate degree in education, and received his master`s degree in the study of education at Nagoya University. He researched as a lecturer in Ryukyu University, an associate professor in Saitama University and a professor in Kyushu University. He earned his Ph.D. in education at Kyushu University, Japan.  His main areas of interest are history of social education in Japan, reorganaization of social education administration, social pedagogy in Sweden, community education and lifelong learning in Japan.
Lan Xiao, Nagoya University

2003-2007, Dalian Nationalities University, China.

       Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures, Bachelor

2007-2010, Kyushu University

      Graduate School of Human Environment Studies, Social Education, Master

2010-2015, Nagoya University

     Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Social Education, Doctor Course 

2014-Now, Nagoya University

     Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Designated Assistant Professor

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Published
2015-12-22